Meet Me in St. Louis

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The Gateway Arch–Masonic or not?

Thursday

I’ve had a great day here in St. Louis.  Just after breakfast I got a call from Cat and Rob, a couple I met in Italy.  When they told me that they were from St. Louis, I knew that I had to come here, but I thought it was going to require a special trip.  I took a look at Google Maps and saw that a detour to St. Louis only added two hours to the trip from Asheville to Paris, Texas.  So I had no excuse not to come.  I had told them that I was coming to St. Louis, and we set a time for a visit.

But first I needed to take care of God’s business.  Tim and I agreed to go to the Gateway Arch this afternoon.  What I had found on the internet was the Cahokia Indian Mounds just outside of town.  The mounds are a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  Almost all of UNESCO’s sites are ancient blood sacrifice places, so there’s motive to pray.  But as I was programming it into the GPS, the Holy Spirit changed the plan.  He wanted me to go pray at Monsanto.

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The Mounds look like the Mayan pyramids.

Monsanto is the inventor and producer of Genetically Modified seeds (GMO), which I believe are very harmful to the body.  And Monsanto has such a strong lobby group that they have all sorts of weird laws that work in their favor: laws that require farmers to buy seed from them year after year, laws that do not require labeling to identify the use of GMO products in packaging, and so forth.  I believe that these things are not only a really, really bad idea, I believe that it’s actually satanic.  And the only reason that I even knew about Monsanto being based in St. Louis is because one of my ex-husband’s colleagues was offered a job here.

As I left the hotel it was raining.  I started to pray for the rain to stop, but instead I felt led to actually thank God for the rain.  I realized that God was allowing the rain for my advantage.  So I began thanking Him for the rain.

At the Monsanto headquarters I discovered that the place is huge.  Led by the Holy Spirit GPS, I didn’t go in the first gate I came to, but went around the corner to the second gate.  There was a guard station.  I dutifully stopped because there was a stop sign.  But the guard station was unmanned—probably because of the rain, thank You Jesus!

Upon entering the gate, I went to the center of the campus and found a reflecting pool.  Reflecting pools are a satanic symbol for their belief “As above, so below,” which you can also see depicted in a lot of satanic art.  The statue of baphomet[1] is an example of this reflection belief.  This reflecting pool one has three artificial trees at the end of it.  Immediately I understood the three plastic trees to represent the three crosses of Calvary.  The fact that they are plastic reveals how they believe that man can be his own savior.

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Of course in winter the reflecting pool doesn’t reflect so well.

After praying there to break the spirit of humanism, the Holy Spirit instructed me to drive around the whole campus.  Monsanto has other campuses, but this one is the headquarters, and it is huge.  The buildings are all lettered, and the highest letter I saw was W.  So I drove around the campus, praying in the spirit, and sometimes praying in English.  When I prayed in English I was praying for the salvation of all the people that work for Monsanto.  After all, Monsanto employs a whole lot of people, and God is primarily interested in saving souls.  Besides, most of the people that work there don’t know a thing about the witchcraft being practiced by upper management.

From there I went to Cat and Rob’s house.  Since we hadn’t had a lot of time to get acquainted at our first meeting in Italy, we spent some time getting to know each other.  I had met them in Italy through a close friend whose ministry I support: Samuele.

When Rob heard that I am heading to Texas from here, he asked where, exactly.  I told him: Paris, Dallas, Abilene, Austin, and Houston.  He asked me if any of that is near Midland.  Abilene is the closest, being about two hours from Midland.  He said that they know a young couple that live in Midland.  Immediately he took out his phone and called Gil.

After a brief introduction, he handed me the phone.  I didn’t really know what to say, mostly because Rob hadn’t really told me anything about Gil.  I could feel the awkwardness on Gil’s end as well.  But we muddled through and Gil told me that he might be coming to Abilene while I’m there.  As I handed the phone back to Rob, he was beaming with the accomplishment of having put us together.

Then Rob excused himself because he had an appointment.  Cat invited me to lunch.  We had lunch at her favorite place, and I took her recommendation, eating the same dish that she ordered.  We had a really nice visit over a lovely lunch.  In the course of conversation, I told her that I had two weddings to attend in the spring.  I needed to find something elegant, but lightweight, and I told her that I don’t want to wear a dress.  She invited me to go shopping after lunch.  I shook my head no on two counts: I have to meet my son, Tim, and I absolutely hate shopping for clothes.

“No problem!” Cat chirped.  “I love to shop.  I would love to shop for you, if you’ll let me.”  If I’ll let her?  Was she joking?  This was a dream come true!  Having seen Cat’s house and how she dresses, herself, I know that she’s got excellent taste.  Of course I jumped at the chance.  I dug out a credit card for her to use, but Cat pushed it away.  “I insist!  I am a bargain shopper, and I never pay full price for anything.  This will be fun!”

I gave her my Asheville address, and tried one more time to give her money to pay with.  She refused, saying that she loves shopping and is pleased to be able to help me this way.  What a blessing she is!

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Ready for the weddings!

I found Tim at the hotel room and we set off on foot to go see the Gateway Arch.  It was drizzly and cold, and as the sun set it got even colder.  I had done no research on the Arch at all, but I believed that it must be Masonic.  Since it was late afternoon on a drizzly gray day, there were only three visitors, besides us.

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The guide told us that the Arch had been built in 1963.  Being old enough to remember, I immediately thought of the Kennedy assassination.  I was eight years old, and it really jarred me to think that someone would actually kill the president.  The Arch probably has nothing to do with the assassination, but if it is Masonic it’s interesting timing[1].

[1] When I checked the internet later, this is what I found: Masonic Astronomy and Saint Louis’ Gateway Arch.

There were lots of pictures of the building of the Arch, which was quite a feat of engineering.  It is the tallest arch in the world and is the tallest monument in America, at 630 feet.  The Arch is second only to the Eiffel Tower in height[2].  I looked for, but didn’t find any Masonic cornerstone or markings.

Since there were only five of us on the tour, we were able to split up and take three of the egg-shaped elevator pods[3] to the top: Tim and me in one, two girls in another, and the man by himself.  The pods have five seats, but not enough room to stand upright.  Even being just the two of us, the pod was quite small and close[4].  I could easily imagine in the summer heat, with each pod filled to capacity that I would not do well at all.  Even at the top, after the slow ride up, the space is small and cramped, with tiny windows.  Honestly, I couldn’t wait to get back down, but not before I got a couple of decent pictures of the city below.

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I like the night view of the city that I got from the Arch.

The walk back to the hotel was a lot colder and the wind was really whipping.  Tim told me that he was concerned about the weather front that is coming in tonight.  We want to drive to Paris, Texas tomorrow morning, but black ice is predicted.  So I prayed to the One who is able to calm the storms.

Friday

As soon as I woke up, I turned on the TV to check the weather.  The weather map showed all the bad weather happening on the other side of the Mississippi River.  So we had no problems driving today whatsoever.  Thank You Jesus!

And you might be wondering about the Cahokia Indian Mounds that I had mentioned.  I don’t know.  Sometimes it’s not the right time, sometimes God wants a team of two or more to go.  And sometimes God has someone different in mind to go there.  That’s a question for Him.  All I know is that I woke up this morning knowing that I was released to continue on to Texas today, so that’s what we did.

We arrived in Paris just before sunset, and Laurie and Don greeted us warmly.  I’ve known Laurie for over 40 years, and each time we see each other it’s just like we’re still next door neighbors.

And since I had a long drive today, I am going to call it a day.  So far this has been a very successful and fulfilling trip.  I can’t wait to see what God has for me next.  God is good!

About baphomet:

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Apologies for this horrible image, but it’s easier to understand if you can simply see it.

The breasted goat-man with horns is baphomet.  He is pointing up with one hand and down with the other to symbolize the satanic imperative “as above, so below.”  Often he is depicted with an erect penis with snakes like the medical symbol—but not really!  The medical symbol is actually the rod of Aaron with a single snake: the bronze snake that Moses made in Numbers chapter 21—a symbol of Jesus, the True Healer.  It’s called the Rod of Aesculapius.  The two-snaked symbol, the caduceus, is the rod of hermes (AKA mercury).  Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about this mix-up:

It is hard to trust a profession that cannot even get its symbols straight.  Most physicians in the United States think that the symbol of their profession is something called the caduceus.  But this is actually not true.  Historians have discovered that someone in the U.S. Army Medical Corps mistook the caduceus for the Aesculapion and introduced the Medical Corps’ symbol at the beginning of the twentieth century.  Soon thereafter, everyone in the United States was emulating the mistake, (Daniel P. Sulmasy, A Balm for Gilead: Meditations on Spirituality and the Healing Arts).

The caduceus is an especially bad choice as a medical symbol because the Greek god hermes was the patron of commerce and traders, thieves, liars, and gamblers.  And look now at how the pharmaceutical industry, insurance, and hospitals have made medicine into an industry.  What started for most doctors as a calling has become a part of that industry.  And like any industry, the primary objective is to make money.  I don’t believe that the pharmaceutical companies, insurance, or hospitals want to see a cure for cancer any more than the petroleum or automotive industries want to see free, non-polluting fuel for cars.  The status quo is making them rich.  A cure for cancer would put a big dent into their profits.

And how appropriate for Monsanto to blend its symbols so seamlessly with all this nonsense.  After all, Monsanto has been absolutely instrumental in destroying the American family farm so that they could launch agri-business and corner the market with these diabolical synthetic seeds.  The bottom line is that the whole thing is satanically driven and maintained.  Is there anyone out there willing to join me in praying for an end to this evil?

[1] The baphomet is a half-goat, half-man seated on a throne with one hand pointing up and the other pointing down.  I will add more information and observations about the statue of baphomet at the end of this post.

[2] There are taller buildings, but as monuments go, the Gateway Arch is quite tall.

[3] Which they call trolleys.

[4] You can see what the pods look like here: Elevator to the Top.

2 thoughts on “Meet Me in St. Louis

  1. Pingback: Georgia on My Mind—and in My Prayers | Walking By Faith in Europe

  2. Pingback: Witchcraft Unveiled | Walking By Faith in Europe

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